The Structure of Your Offense – No Huddle No Mercy

Q1: In the book, Coach Liotta starts off the implementation of his offense with it being a fun system to be in. How is your offense fun for players and the community?
Q2: Coach Liotta speaks of the critical nature of practice organization. How does the tempo and organization of your practice reflect the style of football you play?
Q3: Communication is key in any offense. How is the play communicated from coach to player and from player to player?
Q4: How does your offense stress the defense?
Q5: How does your off-season reflect and prepare for the style of offense you play? Not just physically, but also culturally
Q6: One of the ways Coach Liotta prepares for an opponent is by looking for matchup advantages. Where do you begin breaking down the opponent’s defense?
Q7: What nuances do you have built in to your offense to give you an advantage in the game?

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Opponent Preparation

Q1: You’ve put together your plan, and now it is time to implement it. What is the first thing you present to your athletes?
Q2: How do you incorporate the opponent into your individual skill practice?
Q3: Do you have a scout team coach who to get your scouts in the right place?
Q4: Do you have specific focus for each group and team session of practice?
Q5: How many times do you want to see your plays and calls against something the opponent does?
Q6: What have you done to simulate the tempo of the opponent?
Q7: What is something that you do that you believe really helps prepare your team for each game?

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Program Scenarios by @kdawgswift

Q1: You have a talented & experienced team going into the season. What do you want to show in your non-district games as a distraction away from your base offense or defense for coaches to prepare for? Explain why.
Q2: Game 5 of the season, against a district/league opponent. You’re the HC/OC, and your talented, but young DC just made a call that resulted in the D giving up a cheap TD to take the lead 21-17 at the half. What do you say to your DC as you meet with him?
Q3: State Championship game, and you’ve got the ball on the plus 35 yard line, with about 55 seconds left in the half. You’re up 28-0 over the most prestigious program in the state. What is your plan of attack and why?
Q4: You’re a coach with a family, and your eldest daughter or son has showed a liking to what you do all those hours away from home and mom. At what age or grade would you allow to travel & be on the sidelines with you? Reasoning?
Q5: You’re on your way from a date night with your wife, and as you’re driving through town, you observe 3 of your student-athletes coming out of a tavern (no minors allowed) at 9pm. What are you going to do?
Q6: Two student-athletes who missed all the summer workouts and fall pre-season practices come to you after two games to see if they can join the team. 1 is a junior who played the last two seasons as a backup. The other is an incoming freshman. What is your response and why?

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A Great Coaching Staff

If you have ever been part of a great coaching staff, you know how remarkable it is.  These men you work with become a family. You enjoy being together, and share the highs and lows of your teams and seasons. Each of us supporting the other through thick, and thin. Good relationships are built by…

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Game Winning Plays

Q1: The ball is on the +30, near hash, with only 10 seconds left in the game. You’re down by 6. What’s your call?
Q2: You just scored a TD to go up by 2. There are two minutes left in a game that has traded scores all night long. Do you kick the FG or go for 2?
Q3: You’re up by 4 with 1:30 left in the game. You have the ball, just across the 50, on the +48. It’s 4th & 1 or 2. Your defense has had success, but the opponent has shown quick scoring ability. What’s the call?
Q4: You’re the visiting team in a playoff game and just scored a TD to bring the score within 1. There is no time on the clock in the 4th quarter. Do you kick for the tie or go for two for the win?
Q5: What is your go to 2 point conversion play?
Q6: When going for two, what is the most exotic formation you have used?
Q7: You’ve got one play to win the game, from somewhere between 30 to 50 yards away. This will be the last play of the game. You’re coming out of a timeout. What do you tell the kids, and what is the play?

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Drills!

Q1: What are the drills you use every year?
Q2: What new drills did you incorporate into your practice this year?
Q3: What drills did you drop this year?
Q4: How do you determine the drills you use, or don’t use from one year to the next?
Q5: Describe your routine and the drills used during individual time.
Q6: When you learn about a new scheme, do you also seek how to teach/drill the necessary skills to execute within the scheme?
Q7: If a player asks for drills they can do on their own, over the summer, at home, etc, what drills do you tell them and do you provide a packet for them?

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Runs, Passes, and Options from a Single Formation

Using a 2 back, TE Flex formation, what do you like to run, pass, and RPO with your offense?
How do you personnel it with your current players in mind?

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Ramifications of Realignment

Q1: How does realignment of the districts impact your school?
Q2: How does realignment of the districts impact you, professionally?
Q3: After seeing your new district, how soon do you start researching any new opponents for the fall?
Q4: Does the district effect the jobs you search for?
Q5: What are the travel situations you face in your district?
Q6: How do you balance your district and non-district schedule?
Q7: What do you enjoy most about realignment?

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